DIY

More From the Editors of ThisOldHouse.com

Oct 18, 2014 / 474 notes

You’ve been using QUIKRETE wrong. More amazing DIY ideas here. -ts

File this under “WhyTF didn’t we think of that?” via jaecha
Oct 18, 2014 / 196 notes

File this under “WhyTF didn’t we think of that?” via jaecha

Fabric + picture frame = desk organizer. Love it or leave it?
Oct 17, 2014 / 655 notes

Fabric + picture frame = desk organizer. Love it or leave it?

This DIY desk is made of two book shelves and an old door. Read more on this and other DIY desk projects via marthastewartliving. -ts
Oct 12, 2014 / 318 notes

This DIY desk is made of two book shelves and an old door. Read more on this and other DIY desk projects via marthastewartliving. -ts

createforless:

Black Marbled Candleholders via Design Sponge
Oct 11, 2014 / 120 notes
Just like you don’t HAVE to use magnetic spice racks in the kitchen, you don’t HAVE to use shower caddies in the bathroom! Could be the perfect organizational upgrade for a small home office wall or craft room. Install a whole row of them if that’s what you need! Go nuts. While you’re at it, put a plastic shoe organizer on a pantry or linen- closet door and don’t use it for shoes! -ts

Great for hair products and styling tools, in a bathroom closet, too.
diyhoard:

 Shower Caddy Storage
Who knew metal shower caddies could make cute storage for your room? Spruce it up with bows, ribbons, and even washi tape.
Oct 10, 2014 / 583 notes

Just like you don’t HAVE to use magnetic spice racks in the kitchen, you don’t HAVE to use shower caddies in the bathroom! Could be the perfect organizational upgrade for a small home office wall or craft room. Install a whole row of them if that’s what you need! Go nuts. While you’re at it, put a plastic shoe organizer on a pantry or linen- closet door and don’t use it for shoes! -ts

Great for hair products and styling tools, in a bathroom closet, too.

diyhoard:

Shower Caddy Storage

Who knew metal shower caddies could make cute storage for your room? Spruce it up with bows, ribbons, and even washi tape.

Queen marthastewartliving's fashion DIY is so on point.

You don’t have to spend a cent on a new leather watch strap; just replace a broken or worn-out watchband with grosgrain ribbon. How-to here.
Oct 8, 2014 / 159 notes

Queen marthastewartliving's fashion DIY is so on point.

You don’t have to spend a cent on a new leather watch strap; just replace a broken or worn-out watchband with grosgrain ribbon. How-to here.

Oct 7, 2014 / 100 notes

REAL APARTMENTS: If you recall, TOA got tired of all the painfully gorgeous, massive NY apartment tours on the Internet because it made us…sad. Our apartments will never look like those apartments. Because those apartments are 2837438294732894 million dollars.

So say hey to native-New Yorker, former thisoldhouse intern, and all-around lover of NYC, Victoria Reitano. Miss Vix is a digital producer and social media consultant who has “done time” at LIVE with Kelly and Michael, Bethenny and The Meredith Vieira Show…and she’s fab, obviously. Here’s what she had to say about her quick apt spruce up earlier today:

Added some wall shelves and moved some furniture around to give my apartment a bit more character. It’s a cheap upgrade that’s ‪#‎DIY‬ and quite painless! ‪#‎vixinthecity‬ Also, how can anything be wrong when you have gorgeous sunflowers!

We LOVE the ombre curtains and fresh sunflowers.

Now show us yours. -ts

Hm. Might be time to update TOH magazine business cards! via Instructables -ts
Oct 6, 2014 / 138 notes

Hm. Might be time to update TOH magazine business cards! via Instructables -ts

Use affordable chicken wire to create this ultra-creepy Halloween “apparition.” Here’s how via thisoldhouse:

Step 1:Form the head: Center the wire piece over your wig form, bowl, or vase. Using your hands, press and pinch the wire into a convex shape for the top of the head. As you work your way down, cinch the hexes more tightly and permanently together where needed, using needle-nose pliers to crimp the wire. Keep going until you’ve got a bell-shaped form that extends to just below the nose.Step 2:Form the chin, neck, and face: Start by pinching the hexes to form the pointy part of the chin. Use the wire snips as needed to clip the wire in a curve roughly following the jawline, so that you can fold and overlap the wire underneath to define the chin and neck. For the back of the head and the nape of the neck, clip the wire vertically and overlap the pieces slightly to form a seam to contour and narrow this area. Continue shaping the wire with your fingers to form the nose, lips, chin, and neck. You’ll now have a head and neck “emerging” from a somewhat flat base of chicken wire.Step 3:Make the shoulders: With the head facing you, snip the wire on each side, where the shoulders will go, to about 6 inches from the head. Make the snips close to the corners of the hexes, which will create longer prongs on the cut sides that can be used for attaching pieces later. Overlap the flaps to form the shoulders and the top of the torso, and secure them using the prongs of the cut wire.Step 4:Make the torso and thighs: Form the wire piece into a cylinder, overlapping the ends by about 3 inches. Attach this to the base of the shoulders; snip the wire on the edges if needed to fasten the two pieces together. Eyeball your ghost to decide where the waist should be, and shape the wire by hand to form it. Create the thighs by snipping the wire vertically in the center front and back, along the “inseam”; bend and fasten each side into thighs.Step 5:Form the arms: To create the straight left arm, form the wire piece into a cylinder, as you did with the torso, but slightly overlap the piece at an angle, so you’ll form a thicker upper arm and thinner lower arm. For the right bent arm, form a bigger cylinder with one piece and a smaller one with the other; fasten them together at a roughly 120-degree angle to form the elbow. Attach each arm to the torso; you may need to clip off a bit of wire near the armpits to do this. With your fingers, contour the wire to look more like arms, with elbows, wrists, and hands. (Bonus points if you create fingers!)Step 6:Make the lower legs: Form cylinders from the wire pieces; attach to the thighs at angles to form the knees. Angle the legs so it appears that your ghost is out for a stroll.Step 7:Make the feet: Form cylinders from the wire pieces. Flatten the cylinders slightly to make soles on the bottoms, and cinch closed one end of each to form toes. Fasten the feet to the calves.Step 8:Make the ax: Fold the wire piece in half so that it measures 12 inches by 6 inches. On the open side of the rectangle, cut out a portion of wire measuring roughly 4 inches by 8 inches, leaving the remainder as an ax-like shape. Overlap the wires along the seams to secure them and to firm up the ax’s handle and blade. Attach the handle to the right hand of your ghost, bending and contouring the hand as needed.Step 9:Put the ghost on display. To help it stand upright, you may need to attach it with rope or wire to a nearby tree, shrub, or part of your house. Or hang the ghost from a tree limb, using several loops of heavy-duty fishing line just taut enough so that its feet rest on the ground.
For shopping list and more, see here.
Oct 5, 2014 / 574 notes

Use affordable chicken wire to create this ultra-creepy Halloween “apparition.” Here’s how via thisoldhouse:

Step 1:
Form the head: Center the wire piece over your wig form, bowl, or vase. Using your hands, press and pinch the wire into a convex shape for the top of the head. As you work your way down, cinch the hexes more tightly and permanently together where needed, using needle-nose pliers to crimp the wire. Keep going until you’ve got a bell-shaped form that extends to just below the nose.

Step 2:
Form the chin, neck, and face: Start by pinching the hexes to form the pointy part of the chin. Use the wire snips as needed to clip the wire in a curve roughly following the jawline, so that you can fold and overlap the wire underneath to define the chin and neck. For the back of the head and the nape of the neck, clip the wire vertically and overlap the pieces slightly to form a seam to contour and narrow this area. Continue shaping the wire with your fingers to form the nose, lips, chin, and neck. You’ll now have a head and neck “emerging” from a somewhat flat base of chicken wire.

Step 3:
Make the shoulders: With the head facing you, snip the wire on each side, where the shoulders will go, to about 6 inches from the head. Make the snips close to the corners of the hexes, which will create longer prongs on the cut sides that can be used for attaching pieces later. Overlap the flaps to form the shoulders and the top of the torso, and secure them using the prongs of the cut wire.

Step 4:
Make the torso and thighs: Form the wire piece into a cylinder, overlapping the ends by about 3 inches. Attach this to the base of the shoulders; snip the wire on the edges if needed to fasten the two pieces together. Eyeball your ghost to decide where the waist should be, and shape the wire by hand to form it. Create the thighs by snipping the wire vertically in the center front and back, along the “inseam”; bend and fasten each side into thighs.

Step 5:
Form the arms: To create the straight left arm, form the wire piece into a cylinder, as you did with the torso, but slightly overlap the piece at an angle, so you’ll form a thicker upper arm and thinner lower arm. For the right bent arm, form a bigger cylinder with one piece and a smaller one with the other; fasten them together at a roughly 120-degree angle to form the elbow. Attach each arm to the torso; you may need to clip off a bit of wire near the armpits to do this. With your fingers, contour the wire to look more like arms, with elbows, wrists, and hands. (Bonus points if you create fingers!)

Step 6:
Make the lower legs: Form cylinders from the wire pieces; attach to the thighs at angles to form the knees. Angle the legs so it appears that your ghost is out for a stroll.

Step 7:
Make the feet: Form cylinders from the wire pieces. Flatten the cylinders slightly to make soles on the bottoms, and cinch closed one end of each to form toes. Fasten the feet to the calves.

Step 8:
Make the ax: Fold the wire piece in half so that it measures 12 inches by 6 inches. On the open side of the rectangle, cut out a portion of wire measuring roughly 4 inches by 8 inches, leaving the remainder as an ax-like shape. Overlap the wires along the seams to secure them and to firm up the ax’s handle and blade. Attach the handle to the right hand of your ghost, bending and contouring the hand as needed.

Step 9:
Put the ghost on display. To help it stand upright, you may need to attach it with rope or wire to a nearby tree, shrub, or part of your house. Or hang the ghost from a tree limb, using several loops of heavy-duty fishing line just taut enough so that its feet rest on the ground.

For shopping list and more, see here.

Oct 5, 2014 / 448 notes

Sometimes, all the planets align for kitchen-storage hack greatness. Remember to “measure twice” stick once ;) Pick up the hooks here. via AskAnna. -ts

SPLURGE: Opus Shelving Systems are an oldie but goodie. Get the look via wayfair ($475) or take our DIY dare to build it yourself! -ts
Oct 4, 2014 / 496 notes

SPLURGE: Opus Shelving Systems are an oldie but goodie. Get the look via wayfair ($475) or take our DIY dare to build it yourself! -ts

On a good day at the local Dollar Tree, you could do this for under $5. -ts
Oct 2, 2014 / 322 notes

On a good day at the local Dollar Tree, you could do this for under $5. -ts

As shelter content goes, it seems you’ve got to be a 242-sq.-ft. closet of an apartment OR a $6M West Village rowhouse just to get some love from the Internets. But let’s be real for just a minute: if YOU live in a just-normal-sized, largely unremarkable urban apartment (maybe with roommates and perhaps a smart storage hack here and there) SHOW US. We’ll send you a prezzie for your troubles (if you submit by the end of Sept) and might feature you here at TOA.
Here’s a lil’ nugget from me: If you stand at my coffee table-slash-storage chest you can prettymuch see my whole place…still way bigger than a closet, though. And heere ends your tour! -ts
Oct 2, 2014 / 124 notes

As shelter content goes, it seems you’ve got to be a 242-sq.-ft. closet of an apartment OR a $6M West Village rowhouse just to get some love from the Internets. But let’s be real for just a minute: if YOU live in a just-normal-sized, largely unremarkable urban apartment (maybe with roommates and perhaps a smart storage hack here and there) SHOW US. We’ll send you a prezzie for your troubles (if you submit by the end of Sept) and might feature you here at TOA.

Here’s a lil’ nugget from me: If you stand at my coffee table-slash-storage chest you can prettymuch see my whole place…still way bigger than a closet, though. And heere ends your tour! -ts

DAILY FIND: Of all the words you can paint on a doormat, these are among the most useful. You could DIY it VIA apartmenttherapy. But you could also just buy it. -ts
Oct 2, 2014 / 294 notes

DAILY FIND: Of all the words you can paint on a doormat, these are among the most useful. You could DIY it VIA apartmenttherapy. But you could also just buy it. -ts